Workshop Wednesday: Coffee!

This strip is about as close as I’ve ever come to having a truly autobiographical strip: my poor wife is always telling me I need to drink more water to offset the copious amounts of coffee I ingest.

I started this week’s strip knowing that I wanted Mike to finish with “Water be for the weak!”

So the action itself was pretty easy: wife comes and gives him a glass of water. She leaves. He drinks the coffee.

In the process of sketching it out, I got the fun idea that he actually drinks the pot of coffee itself. I think that nice little twist makes the strip.

coffee A

So after the last couple of weeks of some pretty tough processes, this weeks’ strip came to me pretty quick and it was a lot easier than the last few to execute. Here’s where I finished up, tweaking the words a bit:

coffee 2 750

I must confess: after the weeks of wrestling with The Crew, this strip was a pleasant change of pace!

The lines are a little too thick on Mike in the last panel and the mug and glass of water mysteriously scoot across the countertop in the last panel, but I thought they worked better spatially a little further over anyway, so I left them alone. I had to space everything out a bit or the coffee pot would have been obscured by the coffee maker. Can’t have that!

I also moved the balloon in the third panel from the top-center to the middle-right. I convinced myself that this gave just an instant more of a delay, like Mike was just waiting one more beat for his wife to leave the room before he so bravely chugs the pot of coffee! So that’s just me, but I liked it.

As always, thanks everyone! Look forward to your thoughts! See you Friday for the new strip.

Brad

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12 thoughts on “Workshop Wednesday: Coffee!

  1. When this one came through my email last week, I laughed my arse off! I think it is really funny and SO TRUE!
    I chug it from the pot too… or at least I want to.
    I really like the motion lines in the second panel. Very nice.

    How does the drawing process go for you? Do you just love to doodle and find joy in every line? Or is it sometimes a struggle and just plain hard work? I ask because I came to drawing late in my life and often find taking pencil to paper to be anxiety producing. Any words of wisdom?

    I always enjoy the sense of freedom in your drawings.
    (And by the way… my site is back up. Latest art crisis for Pamo is resolved…ing….ed….)

    Like

    • Ha! It’s a struggle and just plain hard work, though at times I do find joy in the lines. It’s just that I am lucky enough to not really expect or hope for it, though I do have that experience enough to keep me going. Taking pencil to paper is indeed anxiety-producing. It’s something I struggle with, too. Let me think about a fuller answer to that. I’m not sure how I continue to overcome it, but I think I might be able to if I take some time to give you a thoughtful answer. As for crisis, well, hey! What would we be without our crises! Seriously. I just look at that as part of the terrain that’s going to come up every now and then. It doesn’t make it any easier, but sometimes it keeps me from panicking! I’m so glad you get a sense of freedom from my drawings. I think part of that comes from me deciding, hey, this is what my drawing finger-print looks like. Some people have finger prints that other folks find so beautiful that they will pay money to see it regularly. Others can’t. But that doesn’t mean I don’t have a fingerprint. It’s like I’d rather have red hair and a rugged beard. Oh, well. Brown hair. Thin, patchy beard. But, hey! It’s mine! šŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

      • Great answer Brad and I thank you for it. Jeff told me to draw a character today- handed me a pen and wouldn’t let me overthink it even though I really wanted to start over after finishing. I like what you said about a drawing finger-print… I like how you worded it.
        I enjoy your finger-print and even spent money to buy it šŸ™‚ Coffee never tasted better than out of my Pirate Mike mug.
        I appreciate what you do here with process. It’s fun to read and is very helpful in my own process.

        Like

      • Yeah, I know this will sound bizarre coming from me, but, when I’m in a slump, one of the first things I do is try to crank them out as fast as I can without revising them. And your fingerprint grows and changes with time, right? So does the drawing. I appreciate your kind words. They always brighten my day. As for other things to do when anxiety kicks in, I try to remember that I really only have one goal: to make a comic. My goal isn’t really to get them to be liked or to have them be “good” or even really to have them liked by me. I just need a product. So if I have a strip done, goal accomplished. Anything beyond that is really beside the point and gravy. Don’t get me wrong: I want my comics to be enjoyed by billions until the end of time, but as far as dealing with anxiety, I find that if I realize that I can only set goals for which I can control the outcome (ie, I can finish a strip), then I calm down and get refocused. I can’t do anything about other people liking it, me liking it, it being “good,” etc etc ad nauseam. But I _can_ make a strip. So that’s the goal. Beyond that, I try to tell myself, hey, don’t get greedy! šŸ™‚

        Liked by 1 person

    • Ha! It’s a struggle and just plain hard work, though at times I do find joy in the lines. It’s just that I am lucky enough to not really expect or hope for it, though I do have that experience enough to keep me going. Taking pencil to paper is indeed anxiety-producing. It’s something I struggle with, too. Let me think about a fuller answer to that. I’m not sure how I continue to overcome it, but I think I might be able to if I take some time to give you a thoughtful answer. As for crisis, well, hey! What would we be without our crises! Seriously. I just look at that as part of the terrain that’s going to come up every now and then. It doesn’t make it any easier, but sometimes it keeps me from panicking! I’m so glad you get a sense of freedom from my drawings. I think part of that comes from me deciding, hey, this is what my drawing finger-print looks like. Some people have finger prints that other folks find so beautiful that they will pay money to see it regularly. Others can’t. But that doesn’t mean I don’t have a fingerprint. It’s like I’d rather have red hair and a rugged beard. Oh, well. Brown hair. Thin, patchy beard. But, hey! It’s mine! šŸ™‚

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Great comic Brad – I agree with you that having the last speech bubble moved over to the right makes his action seem a lot more furtive and less like he’s devil may care about her overhearing/seeing him. I didn’t notice the teleporting cups at all until you pointed it out – shows how observant I am. Really good one šŸ˜€

    Like

    • I’m glad you like it, Mark. I always find it rewarding when people like this feature. I just love other folks’ process stuff (always have), and it turns out I enjoy sharing mine with others. It’s a lot of fun. It’s really become a major component of working on Mike.

      Like

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